Honoring Hwt-Her: Prayers & Invocations to Hathor

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“Hwt-Her-Mistress of the Sky”/ An original Kemetic icon by Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa. Extra fine watercolor, gold, semi-precious stones on 8″x10” archival panel. Genuine mineral pigments used as watercolor: Lapis lazuli (sourced from Chile), Amethyst (Soladad, Brazil), Bloodstone (Alaska, USA), Jadeite (Alaska, USA), Piemontite (Alaska, USA), Rhodonite (Bellahorizonte, Brazil), hydrated iron oxide (red and yellow ochre). 22 karat gold, turquoise (Tibet), Shattuckite with malachite (from the Shattuck Mine in Bisbee, Arizona). Austrian crystal elements by Swarovski®.

 

Homage to You, Hwt-Her, Lady of Life,
Enveloped in turquoise with the lotus
as your diadem!

O Golden Lady, how can men approach you?
How can the Gods behold your glory,
shining as electrum in the Eastern heaven.
To look upon You is to be blinded
by the fire of your body, casting the
shadow of the Sun as that Great Cobra Goddess.

The Sun’s light does not reveal your completeness,
Though your embodiment is the circuit of the
Wedjat Eye in its time;
it is unknowable, and the Gods cannot fathom
your strides across the Imperishable Stars.

O Goddess, the Mistress of the Sky,
how fair is your countenance,
how dazzling your lips,
your eyes of green malachite,
your eyebrows like the iridescent plumage
of the Sacred Falcon.

How He comes to you, erect upon His perch,
His lofty standard shining with your love.
He embraces you, the One of the Two Horizons,
His two wings not spanning the length of your
divine body.

Smitten, the Lord of Valor becomes yours,
as you, the long-legged Goddess, cause the
faces of the Gods to be turned away,
Ensnared by your beauty.

Homage to You, O Lady of Love
who bestows rapture by the very sight of Her,
whose body challenges the Sun for His light,
whose Father is born through Her,
whose brother becomes the Lord of the Earth
by way of Her thighs!

You, O Hwt-Her, are the sovereign Mistress
before whom the Gods submit their powers.
Mysterious One, who in secret gives birth
to the Sun in His moment of becoming.

Let me, too, come near to You in the hour
of your rising, when in shards of turquoise
your face becomes the illumination of the
Sun-God.

May my two eyes behold You,
may my ears hear the shaking of your papyrus reeds,
may my nose inhale the intoxication of your lotus-fragrance,
and may I be one of those in your entourage
who lives forever on account of You.

– From the Hymns of Hwt-Her Mistress of the Sky
By Master Iconographer Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

These are the words of the artisan Ptahmassu,
Beloved of Ptah, the master color artist,
Great Director of Craftsmen in the House of Ptah
Who has spent his life making images of the Gods,
Who propitiates the Gods through the works of
His hands, dynamic in the Soul-Mansion of Ptah,
Whom Ptah the Lord of Ma’at loves:

Rise, O Goddess, bedecked in the trappings of Ra,
Shining of face like the Disk at sunrise,
Acclaimed by the Vault as its mistress,
Heiress of the sky whose embodiment glitters
With fine gold!

Rise, O Hwt-Her, Hand of the Netjer!
Your body, young and perfectly appointed,
Causes Atum to rise in His season,
His passion becoming the verdant land,
His seed bearing the fruit of the Sacred Land.

Rise, O Hwt-Her, the Golden One,
Upon whose brow radiates the Eye of the Disk,
Whose radiation flares as the Cobra Goddess,
Her terror filling the hearts of gods and humankind.

O Beautiful One, the perfect countenance of
Her father in his sky, Ra has lifted you up,
Your body forming the domain of heaven,
Your navel becoming the great Mooring Post.
The Ark of the Day shines by your light!
The Ark of the Night follows your glistening
Thighs into the realm of the Blessed.

Rise, O Hwt-Her, Mansion of the Lofty,
The House of the Falcon, the Residence of the
Elevated One!

Your embodiment is the seat of the Eye,
Whose wholeness becomes you,
Whose powers shine through you,
Whose life is renewed at your coming home
From the south.

Djehuty the Lord of Eight-Town comes out
To hail you, acclaiming your powers, and
Leading you to your throne at the Filling of
The Wedjat Eye.

Rise, O Hwt-Her, Mistress of Turquoise,
Mistress of real Lapis-lazuli, upon whose
Limbs glitters indestructible gold,
That skin of the gods which brings joy
To the hearts of humankind, through whose
Magic the netjeru possess the entire circuit
Of the sun.

Rise, O Goddess, O Hwt-Her, O Mistress of Love,
Lady of Intoxication swimming through the
Thighs of men!

They see you, their hearts beat fast and their
Loins shudder in rapture.

They hear the music of your feet, the shaking
Of your breasts, the swaying of your hips.
All men make a dance for you, you who grant
The joys of lovemaking, the beauty of the flesh.

Rise, O Hwt-Her, the Daughter of Ptah, His beloved,
The ornament of Ra Whose brow dazzles as the
Eye of the Sun!

Come, O Goddess, in peace and in beauty!
Awaken in peace, O Hwt-Her, awaken in beauty.
Awaken in peace, O Golden One, awaken in beauty.
Awaken in peace, O Lady of Life, awaken in beauty.
Awaken in peace, O Lady of the Green, awaken in beauty.
Awaken in peace, O Eye of Ra, awaken in beauty.
Awaken in peace, O Mistress of the Sky, awaken in beauty.
Awaken in peace, O Mistress of the West, awaken in beauty.

O Goddess, your holy image is established on earth and
Outshines the circuit of the sun, the zenith of your powers
Becoming this image in the eyes of humankind.

Let all honor be yours in it, and the fruits that come forth
Be all things good and pure!

These are the words of Ptahmassu, having consecrated
This body, this ba of the Great Goddess Hwt-Her,
Calling it after Her “Hwt-Her Mistress of the Sky“.

-Consecration prayer for the icon Hwt-Her Mistress of the Sky
By Master Iconographer Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa 

O Goddess, Hwt-Her,
What light heaven has
Belongs to You.
O Divine Hand,
Mansion of the Falcon!

In the east, where You dazzle,
Giving birth to the beetle
Of scintillating armor;
In the west, where the tips
Of your golden horns
Welcome the spirits of
The Blessed Dead.

Homage to You, Hwt-Her!
Mistress of Turquoise,
From whose glittering limbs
Ra in the vault draws pleasure,
Between whose loins
The face of the sun emerges.

Dawn, beckoning, shining with joy,
Your face captivates the eyes of the Gods,
Whose heads are turned in your
Eastern direction.

Lapis lazuli, your hair,
A token of the Sun-God’s glory.
The curves of your muscles and sinews
Shifting beneath a gown woven of
Transparent illumination.

Your mandrake lips, your honey breath,
Leaving all gods breathless,
And bestowing the breath of life
To humankind.

O Goddess, Hwt-Her,
Enwrapped by the falcon wings
Of your beloved,
Whose name your womb enshrines;
Heru, His ardor finds fulfillment
Within your house of rosy flesh.

Homage to You, Hwt-Her!
Mistress of Heaven who renews
The foreign lands,
Whose deft fingers draw out
From the earth all that is precious.
Decorated with the turquoise light
Of the sun, its rays find You,
Its magnificence crowns You
Like a royal diadem,
Shooting forth the awesome terror
Of the Cobra Goddess.

O Hwt-Her, your music resounds
Throughout the expanse of the vault,
Awakening the sleepers,
Giving eternal life to the well-provisioned
Spirits, who find their home in your
Indestructible beauty.

May your light touch my face.
May it awaken the Gods.
May your grace adorn the earth,
Renewed by the power of your love.
May I find a home in your womb,
So that I, like the Ancestors,
May be birthed as the eternally shining
Sun, like Ra, to live forever in the
Ark of Millions.

O Hwt-Her, O Goddess,
Mistress of Turquoise!
Your feet stride softly,
Providing a mirror of golden light
To those twilight dwellers,
To those who abide in the outer darkness.
Ra Himself comes into being
Through your womanhood,
As do all living beings,
Who draw strength from your body
Like the earth from the sky.

– From the Hymns of Hwt-Her Mistress of the Sky
By Master Iconographer Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

What desolate voices have called me out
Beneath turquoise skies and wasted valleys?
To make love beneath Your embrace,
To empty my loins within Your intoxicating
Influence;
Hwt-Her, am I under Your Western sky?

Stars kiss the lapis vault without obstruction,
How far my eyes may behold Your grace.
O bovine gilt and wet with the Milky Way’s
Lust, never spent, ever ambitious in Your
Holy light.

O moon, fresh, painted only in naked white
Veil, I stroke Your tender thighs, I sweeten
My tongue with Your beauty!
Hwt-Her, am I under Your Western sky?

When I kiss, make love, taste the nectar of
My true love’s bud, I wonder at the
Passionate sweep of starlight, the horns of
The Celestial Cow prodding the noble Moon.

The desert, so ambitious, possesses my eyes
Relentlessly, and yet is Your favored cavern,
Where deep inside the miracle of life is
Renewed.
Hwt-Her, am I under Your Western sky?

O Golden One, the Hand of the God,
Hwt-Her, within Whose house the ardor
Of the Falcon arises!

Mountains in the West open their portals
Upon hearing the sweetness of Your voice,
The Sun coming home again, alighting
On the noble perch, swathed in the
Turquoise beams of Your sacred body.

O Hand, blushing cheek, honey lips,
Tresses of blue-black like real lapis lazuli;
Yours is the countenance that ensnares
The hearts of gods, Whom Ptah the
Beautiful of Face cherishes.

O Star, sweet bovine, the Ark of the Sky-Lord,
There is no remedy for a man who holds
Fast to Your scent, when breezes like the
Northern gust take heart and eyes with
Sudden delight.

Hwt-Her, the very body of the God, Whose
Dazzling plumage shines in Your Sun,
Whose eyes are ruled by Your eye,
Whose nobility is the power of Your loins,
Whose beauty is the mirror of Your love.

O Holy Lady, Mistress of the Western Mountain,
I call You to come in Your glory, bestowing the
Boon of love, the favors of Your Lord, Whose
House on high is the House of Your golden
Loins.

Hwt-Her, the sweet essence, the fire, the Eye of Ra,
Appear not in Your terror but in Your beauty, come,
Enchant the heart with goodness, and make of my
Flesh a vessel for the miracle of Your love!

– From the Hymns of Hwt-Her Mistress of the Sky
By Master Iconographer Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

All text and image copyright © 2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

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Getting Personal With the Gods: How I Found Grace in the Religion of Ancient Egypt By Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa, Pr.H/ Temple of Auset Nevada

Roman statue of Isis Hadrian era.jpg

How I Found Grace in the Religion of Ancient Egypt

When I was six years old I had my first powerful brush with the gods of ancient Egypt. In the pages of Encyclopedia Britannica I found photographs of statues, bas-reliefs, amulets, coffins and paintings depicting super-human beings with animal heads…jackals, snakes, cats, crocodiles and a dung beetle. A glittering golden icon of the god Ptah with his characteristic skull cap, a treasure from the tomb of Tutankhamun, enticed me to keep looking, to dig deeper for more. For most people unfamiliar with the nuances of ancient Egyptian art and religious iconography, the goddesses and gods of the Nile Valley present a bewildering and incomprehensible spectacle. A fusion of human and animal, each bearing their own set of complex crowns, regalia and signs, the netjeru or gods embody the fantastical and magical, seemingly defying the mortal realm and anything we could recognize as logical. The gods of ancient Egypt appear to defy logic, and are infinitely locked within the framework of their strange myths.

I was bitten by the bug (or should I say Scarab?) of ancient Egypt at an age when other kids were discovering cowboys and Indians and J.I. Joe. Today this would be nothing unusual, as ancient Egypt is all the rage from grade school to high school, and the Internet has created an endless place for discovery and research geared towards young people who are fascinated by this ancient world of pyramids and mummies. “King Tut” is a household name even for kindergarteners, and the recent global exhibitions of the Tutankhamun treasures (among many other collections currently circulating) have perpetuated the continued legacy of Egyptomania like never before. However, I grew up in the era before personal computers, the Internet and the iphone (I’m kidding, right?).

I grew up before Border’s and Barnes & Noble, before you could walk into any bookstore and find countless books on ancient Egypt to satisfy the voracious appetite of any Egyptophile. I had to make due with the few and far between titles available in mall bookstores or school libraries. When I did find those rare books (like E.A. Wallis Budge’s The Egyptian Book of the Dead or Mildred Mastin Pace’s Wrapped for Eternity), I devoured them greedily, taking notes and poring over the pictures for countless hours on end. Yes, it was the mummies and monuments, the fabled riches of Tutankhamun’s tomb that drew me in, but even more than those was the religion and magic of a world with which I increasingly found myself identifying. More than anything else from that culture, it was the gods of ancient Egypt that spoke to my mind and seemed to tug incessantly on the strings of my heart.

My first personal experience with an Egyptian deity happened some time after my seventh birthday. I was hospitalized for a severe concussion after falling over a tricycle, and I remember a terrifying moment when nurses were attempting to draw blood, and I squirmed around trying to prevent them from doing their job. I remember my stomach heaving, vomiting, an intense fear coupled with the fierce desire to get out of that hospital. It was then that I prayed to Imhotep- that most famous of Egyptian architects and physicians who after his death was deified as the son of the god Ptah and worshiped as a miraculous healer. I called on him and asked him to make it all better, and that’s exactly what happened. Call it a fantasy or a concussion-induced hallucination if you must, but I will never forget the vision I saw above my hospital bed: A shaven-headed and wise-looking man with a scroll of papyrus unrolled on his lap, surrounded by a scintillating golden aura. He spoke words in a language I did not know in my intellect, and yet my heart seemed to resonate with the sound and meter. All at once I felt a peace and comfort settle over me, and from that day to this I have called upon Lord Imhotep whenever in pain or in need of healing.

“Great One, Son of Ptah, the creative god, made by Thenen,
begotten by him and beloved of him, the god of divine forms in the temples,
who giveth life to all men, the mighty one of wonders,
the maker of times, who cometh unto him that calleth upon him,
wheresoever he may be, who giveth sons to the childless,
the chief Kheri-heb, the image and likeness of Thoth the wise.”

-Address to Imhotep in the temple of Imhotep at Philae
Imhotep by Jamieson B. Murry, M.A., M.D. Oxford University Press, 1926, pp. 46.

While in grade school I attended St. Alban’s Perish Day School, a private Catholic school, where every Friday we were required to attend chapel, take part in Mass, and to observe the saying of the Lord’s Prayer together with those prayers reserved for the feast days of various saints. I had been raised in the Baptist Church, which for me was appallingly sterile and devoid of mystery or passion. It was my experience with the solemnity and ritual of Catholicism that was to change the way I viewed religion. In the Baptist Church of my upbringing there was little to endear a heart already absorbed in the study of ancient rites of a pagan culture; enduring hour-long sermons in stiff pews surrounded by stark white walls and a plain wooden altar.

This is as agonizingly boring as religion gets! However, Catholicism struck a chord with me, and in it I identified with something that seemed to originate in a time and place much older than the origins of Roman Catholicism. When attending Mass- hearing the chants in Latin, being imbued with incense clouding up from swinging censors, seeing gilded icons glowing mysteriously by candle light- I connected with the temple rituals of the ancient Egyptians, for something in my heart recognized the sound of chanting, the smell of incense, and the power of golden icons.

In chapel there was an especially beautiful marble statue of the Virgin Mary, before which always burned dozens of votive candles in blue glass holders. I remember the morning I made my first prayer to Mother Auset (Isis), seeing in the smiling face and outstretched arms of Christ’s mother the spirit of a much older goddess, whose son Heru (Horus) was the savior-god of the ancient Egyptians. At this time I did not yet have my own statues of the Goddess to adore, so I used the statue of the Virgin Mary as my “stand in” to reach Isis. How can I forget the day Father Treat found me lighting a candle in front of the Virgin and said with a smile, “You are praying to Our Lady?” “No”, I answered with an even bigger smile, “I am praying to Isis”.

“Praise to you, Isis, the Great-One,
God’s Mother, Lady of Heaven, queen of the gods.
You are the First Royal Spouse of Omnophris,
The supreme overseer of the Golden-Ones in
The temples, the eldest son, first(born) of Geb.
Praise to you, Isis, the Great-One,
God’s Mother, Lady of Heaven, queen of the gods.
You are the First Royal Spouse of Omnophris,
The Bull, the Lion who overthrows all his enemies,
The Lord and ruler of Eternity.”

-Hymn to the goddess Isis from the temple of Isis at Philae
Six Hymns to Isis in the Sanctuary of Her Temple at Philae and Their Theological  Significance. Part I . By L. V. Žabkar. The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. 69 (1983), pp. 115-137

Isis was the first goddess of the Egyptian religion to answer my prayers. I came to her at first very timidly, not quite sure how to address a goddess, as I had been raised in the Baptist Church of Christianity, which recognized no goddesses and had no concept of the divine feminine. But I was enchanted by her story, because Isis is no ordinary goddess. Queen of Heaven, yes. Great of Magic, but of course. Crowned and arrayed in the trappings of royalty, to be sure. However, Isis is no loller on the clouds of divine queenship. She is a goddess who knows the sufferings of widowhood, homelessness, imprisonment, forced manual labor, single parenthood, poverty…and the list goes on and on. Something that won the hearts of millions of the ancients was the truly humble story of this powerful goddess whose husband (Ausir or Osiris) was brutally murdered, who then had to flee for her life as a widowed and pregnant mother, to give birth in the marshes of Egypt in hiding and on the run from her husband’s murderer. Isis raised her son Horus in secret, ever aware that the chaotic Set (the murderer of Osiris) would destroy not only her but also her young son. The trials of single motherhood in this day and age included near death encounters with scorpions and crocodiles, and the added humility of begging for scraps and help from rich matrons who slammed their doors in the goddess’ face.

This was the story that captivated the ancients, and, when Christianity was struggling to overtake the East, made it difficult for evangelists to convert adherents of the Goddess to the doctrine of Christ. The faith of Isis, Osiris and Horus is the story of a divine family enduring and transforming through very human circumstances. It is also the story of resurrection from death that formed the foundation of the Egyptian belief in immortality and physical resurrection from the dead. Long before Christians formed their doctrine of a divine son crucified and resurrected from the dead as the path to salvation, the very ancient Egyptian religion asserted the death and resurrection of its god Ausir (Osiris), and the guarantee of his story to all Egyptians that they could follow in his footsteps and be risen from the dead into the paradise of the Blessed. Central to this belief was the magic of the goddess Isis, who had used the insurmountable skill of her magic to revive her murdered husband from the dead. Upon achieving her aim, she conceived a holy child, the falcon-headed god Heru (Horus), who became to the Egyptians the very embodiment of divine justice, truth, and righteousness.

The story of Heru’s struggle to overcome the obstacles of his tumultuous childhood and regain the throne of Egypt from the murderer of his father had a particular meaning to me as a young boy; for the story of Horus is essentially the story of history’s first underdog turned top dog. He is a child who experiences severe tragedy and darkness, then, as a young man, enters a vicious struggle against his uncle in order to regain his stolen throne.

The trials of Heru seem to know no bounds, but he is, in the end, rewarded with justice, and himself becomes the embodiment of truth overcoming brute force and immorality. Horus, once perceived as the outcast renegade of the Egyptian marshes, proves his valor to the gods of Egypt, and wins the kingship of his father as the god of strength and honor. To a young boy who was also a runt, often an outcast amongst other children his age and the butt of many a joke, the story of Heru made me believe in the probability of noble character to surpass mere brute strength, and the significance of maintaining one’s moral and spiritual integrity even in the face of the most violent opposition. My prayers to Isis and Osiris inevitably included earnest petitions to the holy son Horus, the valiant god whose power of truth could help me defeat the schoolyard bullies, and survive the heartache of a troubled domestic life.

“I am Horus the Behdetite, great god, lord of the sky,
Lord of the Upper Egyptian crown,
Prince of the Lower Egyptian crown,
King of the Kings of Upper Egypt,
King of the Kings of Lower Egypt,
Beneficent Prince, the Prince of princes.
I receive the crook and the whip,
For I am the lord of this land.
I take possession of the Two Lands
In assuming the Double Diadem.
I overthrow the for of my father Osiris
As King of Upper and Lower Egypt for ever!”

-The speech of the god Horus from his temple at Edfu
The Triumph of Horus: An Ancient Egyptian Sacred Drama. Translated and edited
By H.W. Fairman. University of California Press, 1974, pp. 106.

I was raised in a very religious family, and I have always been a very religious person. I was even religious as a kindergartener. My problem as a child was that I was drawn to the “wrong” religion. Something about monotheism stuck in my craw and seemed to chew up my insides. And something about church made me shake me head for want of something more. Where are the statues?, I remember asking myself while daydreaming during Sunday school about being anywhere but there. Where are the flowers, the chants…the Mysteries? They had these in ancient Egypt, I told myself, so why shouldn’t they be in the houses of God now? Somehow, it all seemed wrong to me, and I never felt very right sitting in those stiff wooden pews surrounded by black-tied and suited fathers beside their starchy looking wives. I couldn’t stand church, because to my little mind it felt completely separate from the Divine. It seemed more about who was wearing what, and showing off good Christian morale than about finding and serving God. And which God?, I always asked myself. Some distant and wrathful old man flying around out there, just waiting to send irredeemable souls to the lake of fire. Even at eight-years-old I said to myself that one god was just not enough, let alone a jealous and angry god that would condemn his “chosen people” to forty years of hard time in the wilderness. So, I opted for something else.

When I was entering puberty my father told me I needed to be baptized. He was close friends with the preacher, whose son was just about my age and was going to be baptized in a group ceremony for young adults. And how would it look if I decided not to be baptized too? How would it make my father look, my family? Church was, after all, a place where one’s status in society could be firmly established. It’s where you showed off your new car, your wife’s 24 karat gold rope chain, your son’s straight A report card. It was also about showing off your Christian do-goodness. My parents were ahead of the game in that department. They volunteered for everything they could, everything from Wednesday night youth group to Sunday picnics and fund raising bake sales. My father was a pillar of the church, so his son just had to be baptized with the other boys. Period.

So I went to baptism class with the preacher’s son, memorized bible verses and evangelical prattle, and generally hated myself because I didn’t believe in any of it, and felt impure at the thought of taking part in it. Why did I feel impure? It wasn’t because I felt I was tarnishing Christian values by taking part in something so sacred without being a believer. That thought never crossed my mind. I felt overwhelmed by a sense of slandering the gods I truly believed in, the gods I kept locked away in my heart so that my Christian parents couldn’t see them. I would betray anyone, anything but them. How could I go through with it?

I stood behind the baptismal tank with all the other boys, dressed in my pure white robe, looking up behind the altar at a blue-painted sky in which clouds beckoned the mind to dwell in Christ’s kingdom. But my mind was lower than low, consumed in guilt and conflict, because I was consecrating my body (and, supposedly my soul, too) to the Christian faith in front of the whole community. But then something happened. I felt a presence leading and guiding my heart into awareness of how this moment could be transformed into something sacred for my personal religion, for my gods and my true beliefs. Looking at the four corners of the baptismal tank, I saw in my mind’s eye the four tutelary goddesses of ancient Egypt: Auset (Isis), Nebet-het (Nephthys), Selket and Neith. Their kind expressions and outstretched arms surrounded the waters in a protective embrace, just as they had the fabulous golden canopic shrine of Tutankhamun.

And I saw the baptismal tank not as the waters in which John the Baptist had baptised Christ, but rather as the waters of the sacred Nile, the holiest of rivers to the ancient Egyptians. And I called on the gods of those people, just as I was summoned to take my turn in the waters. I offered to them the vessel of my heart in sacrifice, and gave over my soul, my mind, the entirety of my being, to them and only them. With my mouth I parroted the words the minister spoke, the words he and everyone else believed would make me a true and consecrated Christian- but in my heart I prayed fervently to my gods, and gave myself over into their sacred care. When I was dipped beneath the waters I experienced them as the same waters in which the god Osiris was drowned, the waters beneath which opened up the hidden passage to the Netherworld. And I entered, and from that moment on I belonged to the living gods of ancient Egypt. Like Osiris, I died and was born again, and my life was the vehicle for the glorious gods who still spoke and moved when they were listened to and called upon.

“I come unto thee, son of Nut, Osiris, ruler of eternity. I am a follower of Thoth, rejoicing in all that he has done. He brings for thee refreshing breath to thy nose, life and dominion to thy beautiful face, and the north wind that came forth from Atum to thy nostrils, lord of the sacred land. He lets the light shine on thy breast; he illumines for thee the way of darkness”.

-Excerpt from Spell 183 of the Book of the Dead
The Book of the Dead or Going Forth By Day: Ideas of the Ancient Egyptians
Concerning the Hereafter as Expressed in their Own Terms. Translated by
Thomas George Allen. The University of Chicago Press, 1974, pp. 200.

My Kemetic (ancient Egyptian) icons are my answer and my call to the gods of the Nile Valley. However, these gods are not just fixed in space and time, belonging only to the hazy mythos of a long-dead civilization, nor are they solely the gods of ancient Egypt as a historical culture or geographical location. The netjeru or gods are manifestations of the Eternal, beings who both embody and transcend the extraordinary culture that first recognized them as the components of all life. Nor can they be boiled down to mere archetypes, the play of the human intellect as it attempts to define the undefinable and bestow meaning to what is beyond comprehension. I must ask how an archetype is worthy of worship? Do Christians, for example, worship Christ as an archetype of resurrection or salvation? Do they view his power solely as that of some abstract symbol by which the human mind can label a thing hidden deeply within the recesses of its own mind? The answer is self-evident.

The passion of Christianity lies in the physical existence of Christ, in his historical passion of birth, death and resurrection, in the redemption literally passed down to humankind through the spilling of his blood. There is no Jungian symbolism or Freudian theory that can define for Christians the solid truth of Christ’s sacrifice and promise. So too did the ancient Egyptians view their gods as historical and tangible beings, incarnate in and through the created world. Their powers were very immediate, very real to the mind of the Egyptian, who did not bother with abstract universal thinking, but opted instead to experience the Divine in the here and now, in the flesh, and in the world beyond this one that was as earthy and tangible to the Egyptians as their beloved Egypt.

There are those who, in the spirit of New Age thought, assign the gods to the Jungian realm of abstract symbols inherent to emotional states of being, or simply define them as “nature”. The true gods laugh at such egoistic folly, as human beings strive to quantify, label, and explain away through tidy language the quintessence of the Mysteries. My experience of the gods is that just when you find a convenient label to slap on them, they are sure to change and transcend logic in all its secure forms. That is why the netjeru were served by the ancient Egyptians through the cultic rites they called shetau, “the mysteries”, from a word meaning to “make secret”, “make inaccessible”, “mysterious”, “confidential” (Raymond O. Faulkner, A Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian, pp. 248-249). The gods so enjoy the delicious complexity of form and symbol, name, color, texture and transformation.

To the ancient Egyptians, each deity was the composite of nearly limitless qualities and manifestations of form. Each assisted in lending the power of recognition to the whole; however, ultimately the gods were mysterious and hidden, experienced truly through the magic of ritual and iconographic forms.

So, I wish not only to connect with the netjeru personally as a devotee summoning up their images within the artistic medium, but also to bring these gods to humankind once more. The mission of my creativity is to literally give birth to the gods, for we are told in the so-called Memphite Theology of the Shabaka Stone that the creator-god Ptah determined the offerings and places of worship of the gods, that he made their body as they desired, and that because of this the gods entered into their bodies of all kinds of wood, minerals, clay, and all kinds of other things that grow thereon (Holmberg, The God Ptah, pp. 22). It is through the artistic medium, then, that the gods make contact with human beings, for the artistic medium is that process by which wood, stone, minerals, clay, and the substances that have sprung from the earth are transfigured into the shapes in which it pleases the gods to dwell.

All text and image copyright © 2011, 2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

Prayer For the Bestowal of A Festival Torch to the Goddess Auset, From “Rites and Rituals of the House of Auset” By Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa, Pr.H/ Temple of Auset Nevada

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Celebrant One (Egyptian): Irit teka en hruw neb en netjeret pen Auset henuwt Ma’at iy teka en ka-ek Auset henuwt Ma’at iy seret gereh em-khet hruw irit Ra auw es khai tj em Per-Auset iy-a en ek di-a auw-es irit Heru khai tj em hat  men tj em wepet-ek en ka-ek Auset auw irit Heru em sa-ek anedj her-ek Auset aat res tuw hotep tuw res-ek em hotep res wedjat em hotep res wedjat wer iri hotepuw em hotep

Celebrant Two (English): Making the torch of every day for this Goddess Isis, the Mistress of Truth. The torch comes to your ka, O Isis the Mistress of Truth! There comes that which predicts night after day. The Eye of Ra appears gloriously in the Sanctuary of Isis. I come to you, and I cause that it come, the Eye of Heru, arisen upon your forehead, established upon your brow! To your ka, O Isis, the Eye of Horus is your protection! Hail to you, Isis the Great! You are awake and in peace, you awaken peacefully. The Wedjat Eye awakens in peace. The great Wedjat Eye, who has created offerings, awakens peacefully!

All: The ka of Auset comes forth in peace! The Eye of Horus comes forth in peace. The power of the ka of Auset comes forth in the seat of the Eye of Horus in peace!

Celebrant One: Lights the Sacred Festival Torch and presents it to the face of the Goddess Auset.

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

The White Lotus Liturgy of Auset & Ausir~ Part Three

Offering to Ausir

The adorer of Auset (Isis) and Ausir (Osiris) says:
I come, O my Mother Nuwit,
Into the Celestial Lake, endowed with a pure form,
Endowed with a pure heart, sailing over the Threshold
Of Light as one of the People of the Sun!

My name is ‘Becoming One’, the Egg of the Beginning,
Increasing in the Womb of Nuwit, the Swallower of the Stars!
I come as one of the stars in my name of ‘Completed One’,
The Celestial Father.

I am ‘Flesh of-Ra’ entering the mouth of evening, born anew
In the morning as ‘Flying-Sun’, exalted in His Ark as ‘Becoming One’.
May You receive me into the Secret Temple as one of the Disciples
Of Auset the Great; to live again, to flourish again, to enter
Resurrection as one of the Westerners of Ausir, the Forerunner
Of the Westerners!

The Goddess Nuwit, the Opener-of the Portal-of Heaven, says:
Come, O You Child ‘Flying-Sun’, rising in the eastern waters
Of the Celestial Lake and exalted as the ‘Babe in the Lotus’!
I birth you as the Incarnation of Ra, the First-God, the
Sovereign of the People of the Sun!
You are a child of the Black Land shining with turquoise-
Colored light!

You are as Ausir on that day of His resurrection,
When He became the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, the
Sovereign of All Nations and Lord Above All Gods!

You are as Orion the Holy One, the Portal to the Sacred Mansion,
Embraced by the Goddess Auset-Sothis in the eastern heaven.

You are one of the Disciples of Ausir the Anointed-One.
You come into the Sacred Lake of the Temple of Secrets,
And you are baptized in the Divine Essence of Ausir,
The Lord of Anointing.
Your transgressions are purified like that Wedjat Eye of Ra!
Your body is purified in the presence of the Holy Ka of Ausir,
The Master of Holiness!

The adorer of Auset and Ausir says: I come! I kneel
Beneath that Holy Ished Tree flourishing in the Sacred Courtyard
Of the God’s-House of Secrets!
I receive the Essence of The God in my heart, in my flesh,
As my Ka, in this my body.

I receive the Divine Ka of Auset my Lady!
I receive the Divine Ka of Ausir my Lord
As the fresh water of the south, pouring out from the Spirit
Of Ausir the Lord of Spirits.

Come! Come! Come, O Waters of the Goddess Auset,
Bringing nigh to me the power of everlasting life!
I receive the baptism of Your Holy Spirit O Ausir my Lord!
I receive the baptism of Your Holy Spirit O Auset my Lady!

O Waters, O Auset! O Waters, O Ausir!
O Power of Life pouring out as the Eternal God;
The Life, the Goddess Auset, the Life, the God Ausir, the Life, the Divine Ka!
Auset is the Life, the Holy Way of eternal life!
Ausir is the life, the Holy Way of eternal life
For all of humankind.

O Auset, She is the Lady of Eternal Life from the Primordial Beginning,
Pouring out from the First-Occasion as the Goddess Who bestows
The gift of the Eternal Soul.

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

The White Lotus Liturgy of Auset & Ausir~ Part Two

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I return to the Primeval Flood of the First Occasion of the Gods,
Becoming the Image of Ra in the deep floodwaters,
Emerging from the Coils of the Beginning as the ‘Becoming One’,
Coming forth from the Egg of the Pyramidion as the Phoenix.
The Phoenix is the Spirit of Ausir (Osiris) when He ascended at the
Moment of His Resurrection, when He became ‘The Powerful One’,
The Master of Eternal Life.

I renew my body in the Eternal Flood of Auset (Isis)
I renew my body in the Eternal Flood of Ausir!
I renew my essence in the Waters of Auset in the Beginning!
I renew my essence in the Waters of Ausir in the Beginning!
I renew my Spirit in the Presence of Ausir the King, the
Bestower of the Elixir of Life.

I come! I come again! I come again!
I repeat my life for eternity in Ausir the Vanquisher of Death,
The Eternal God who lives beyond the Gods!

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

The White Lotus Liturgy of Auset & Ausir~ Part One

Auset and Ausir

I give obeisance to Ausir (Osiris) the Glorious Lord in Abedju (Abydos)!
I kiss the earth in the presence of the Netjer, the Divine Incarnation
Of Heaven, coming forth from the Great Shrine as the
Divine Fragrance of the Hidden Land.

O Ausir the Beautiful-Faced One, the King of Eternity and
Master of the Beautiful Country, I smell Your Divine Fragrance
And I am made divine, in Your very image, upon this earth!
I kiss the earth at the Throne of Ausir the Lord, the God
Awoken from silence.

I come, O Ausir! I come into the presence of the Secret Chamber,
And I receive the Divine Fragrance of Your Divine Body.
I pass by the Great Goddess Auset (Isis), inhaling Her sweet fragrance,
Inhaling the Divine Ka of the Sacred House, anointed with the
Divine Power of the Goddess Auset in all Her glory.
My flesh is pure in the presence of Divine Mother Auset!
My body is pure in the presence of the God Heru (Horus), the Master
Of the Two Great Horizons!

My heart is pure in the presence of Ptah, the Lord of the Heart’s Throne!
My backside is pure in the presence of Ra the Lotus-Child,
The Light of the Primordial Beginning!

I ascend the Celestial Ladder of Auset into the Mansion of the
Imperishable Stars!
I ascend the Celestial Ladder of Ausir into the Field of Divinity,
Becoming an Incarnation of Light, filling my heart with white light.
I devour the Light of Ausir’s Divine Body, becoming indestructible
As His Wedjat Eye!

I ascend into the Shrine of Auset, and I see Her Holy Incarnation
Upon the Lotus-Throne.
I ascend into the Shrine of Ausir, and I see His Holy Incarnation
Upon the Lotus-Throne.

The celebrant makes an offering of sandalwood to the Goddess Auset and the God Ausir

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

Prayer For the Bestowal of Holy Oil to the Goddess Auset, From “Rites and Rituals of the House of Auset”~ By Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa, Pr.H/ Temple of Auset Nevada

Alabaster Jar

Homage to You sweet Auset, Possessor of the Holy Oil
That heals the flesh of Ausir (Osiris) in the West,
That heals the powers of the Wedjat Eye in it’s time
Of going forth.

The words of empowerment for the
Oil of Auset:
The power-essence of Auset
The empowerment of Auset
The sap of Auset The essence of Auset
The dominion of Auset
The flesh of Auset
The efflux of Auset
The living power of Auset
The spine of Auset
The member of Ausir
The virility of Ausir

The oil of Auset is opened to the
Empowerments and evolutions of
Divine manifestation infinitely!

Olive oil within a jar of fine white ceramic is offered to Auset the
Mistress of the Consecration Power.

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

Prayer For the Bestowal of a Flame to the Goddess Auset, From “Rites and Rituals of the House of Auset”~ By Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa, Pr.H/ Temple of Auset Nevada

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Homage to You Auset, Possessor of the Holy Fire
That repels demons and subdues the foes of justice!
I come carrying the torch of the Sacred Land,
Opening the Doors of Heaven, throwing open
The Doors of the Secret Vault, summoning the
Secret powers of the Primordial Gods, awakening
Your dazzling Ka for the accomplishment of Truth!

A candle within a bowl of fine red ceramic is offered to Auset the Mistress of the Sanguine Power.

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

Prayer For the Bestowal of Incense to the Goddess Auset, From “Rites and Rituals of the House of Auset”~ By Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa, Pr.H/ Temple of Auset Nevada

Wedjat Eye

Homage to You Auset, Possessor of the Holy Incense
That empowers the Kas of the indestructible Gods!
O Auset-Amenti, the Mistress of the Holy West!
I avert darkness on your behalf, pacifying the wrath
Of the Wedjat Eye of Ra and healing your wounds
Like the Wedjat Eye upon my vertex.
Awake O Secret Fire of the Great God Ra!
Awake O Secret Ka of my Divine Portal!
Awake O my Secret Temple of the Holy Mansion of the Heights!
You are the Celestial Fire.
You are the Celestial Watchtower.
You are the blazing light of Ra’s Wedjat Eye.
O hail Secret Fire coming forth from the Wedjat Eye
Of the Great God Atum!

Pellets of frankincense and myrrh are burned upon a brazier as an offering to Auset the Mistress of the Revivifying Power.

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa

Prayer For the Bestowal of Nile Water to the Goddess Auset, From “Rites and Rituals of the House of Auset”~ By Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa, Pr.H/ Temple of Auset Nevada

Nile and West Bank

Homage to You Auset, Possessor of the Holy Flood
That renews the earth and opens the Kas of the Gods!
I come carrying the Waters of the Nuwn, the
Sacred essence of The God, and come
Into being as a manifestation of the
Primordial Beginning.

Lo! I am immersed, I am alone, I am the
Wedjat Eye at its moment of immersion,
Whole and unsullied, perfect in its completeness,
The incarnation of true power flourishing upon
The Waters!

Pure water within a bowl of white ceramic is offered to
Isis the Mistress of the Purification Power.

All text copyright © 2001-2015 Rev. Ptahmassu Nofra-Uaa